Women In Motorsports pt. 1

Season 1. Blog 8.

Welcome back Friend,

Everyone has a love for racing, and most are aware that there’s a lot that goes into the racing community and in order to keep it running smoothly and efficiently. I have hand selected several Women In Motorsports to interview, and to find out a little bit more about them and how they are involved in the racing industry, on a local and country wide stage. I think this is an exciting addition to my blog, and answer a bunch of questions, helping support the theory of “You can be involved in racing, as a female, if you don’t have the opportunity to be in the driver’s seat”.  Read through these interviews and I can assure you, there’s more to the industry, than just being behind the wheel.

These women have been selected because they are behind the scenes of racing, and not always in the public eye, but have their own goals set to promote the sport we love in a positive way.  This is the exact reason, I felt it would be a unique opportunity to get to know a few of them, as they’re hundreds more in each small town or big town racing community!

Let’s meet some of the many women involved in the different compounds of our Motorsports community!

Women of Motorsports - Let’s get to meet them in no particular order…In part 1, “Women In Motorsports” blog series, we will get to know more about: Georgia Henneberry, Kylie Glatfelter, Brooke Rowden, Brittany Hapney, Mandee Pauch


Georgia Henneberry

 Photo submitted. Find Georgia on Social Media:   Facebook   .    Instagram   .    Twitter   .

Photo submitted. Find Georgia on Social Media: Facebook. Instagram. Twitter.

Age: 20

Hometown: St. Louis, Missouri

1.       How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry?

I got involved in the Motorsports industry when I became interested in asphalt road-course karting at the age of 12. Before Motorsports, I barrel-raced horses for a majority of my childhood. Technically I have always had horse-power. (Sorry way cheesy)

2.       Are you associated with a team, division, track, sponsor, etc.?

The type of Motorsports I am mainly involved in would be grass-roots non-wing sprint car racing. I travel on the USAC National schedule covering 3 divisions. Sprint Cars, SilverCrown, and Midget series. We do about 70 races a year a year covering a majority of the country.

3.       How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

Originally, I got involved in the Motorsports industry because I wanted to drive. I had the passion for speed coming from the equestrian side and Motorsports had always intrigued me. It was not until later in my career that I realized the reporting aspect of the sport was what I wanted to pursue. I have always found myself to be personable and great at communicating, so if I can mold those qualities mixed with my love for Motorsports then that is the dream.

4.       How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

Truly, I believe my impact on the Motorsports industry has just begun. Within the 8 years I have been involved in the sport, the relationships I have made and the information I have learned make me eager to fulfill a substantial roll in the broadcasting side of the sport. Currently, my favorite award that I have received would have to be my ‘Outstanding Media Award’ gifted by the St. Louis Racing Fan Club. It means a great deal to be recognized by your hometown and I hope to make them proud. The positives of the sport are endless. During a majority of the year we eat, breathe, and sleep racing and when the season slows down that’s when the brainstorming happens on how to grow and develop for next year.

5.       What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

Chili Bowl in early January, is my favorite event to attend and a great way to get the year kicked off. In the racing community there aren’t many events that allow people from all kinds of racing to attend based on their buys schedules. Chili Bowl allows us all to get together and be one family. Plus, the racing is unforgettable and the intensity is through the roof


Kylie Glatfelter

 Photo submitted. Find Kylie on Social Media:   Facebook       Instagram   .    Twitter   .

Photo submitted. Find Kylie on Social Media: Facebook Instagram. Twitter.

Age: 20

Hometown: Dover, PA

1.       How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry?

I am involved in the Motorsports because I work for Hyper Racing as a Representative, I also work for Williams Grove Speedway as a Social Media Guru, with my partner, Liam Tenzca.

2.       Are you associated with a team, division, track, sponsor, etc.?

I am the official cheerleader for the #44; Trey Starks, and #24; Lucas Wolfe! LOL. I also hope to partner up with a team to manage their social media outlets.


3.       How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

I got into Motorsports at the age of 10. I worked at Susquehanna Speedway (now known as Bapsquehanna, I gave it a nickname) Starting at that young age, the racetrack was my playground. My best friends were at the track, and their parents owned the track so majority of our days in the summer included crawling under the bleachers to collect cans and burn trash. That’s also where I learned to drive… and crash. Next time you’re at BAPS look at turn four… that big hole is from me. I’ve worked in many different positions at the track - Concession Stand Manager, Ticket Seller, Pit Shack, 50/50 Ticket Seller, PR Director, and my favorite role; Trophy Queen. My brother also ran quarter midgets at Susquehanna’s Outback Track, so I was always there on Friday’s as well.

4.       How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

In 2017, I won the title of Ms. Racing Xtravaganza 2017. It was an amazing year. I learned valuable networking skills, and I had the privilege of interacting with incredible people and children. I wasn’t just a “Trophy Queen”. 98 races later I’ve learned to not only smile at the racetrack in Victory Lane, but also partake behind the scenes, turn wrenches, and assist with promoting races at various tracks. I consider myself as an ambassador for our wonderful sport. I hope that I was a good role model for the younger females looking up to me, to say the least. I had the opportunity to attend 98 races during the 2017 season. WHICH IS RIDICULOUS and IMPRESSIVE. I had a ton of weeks that I had 3-4 races per week. I was able to attend some of the biggest races in Central Pennsylvania, some including; Weikert Memorial (all three days) at Port Royal Speedway. Summer Nationals and the National Open at Williams Grove Speedway. The All Star Circuit of Champions Race at Susquehanna Speedway (now known as BAPS Motor Speedway.) All of the USAC Eastern Storm races, USAC Midget Week, and 600 Micro Speedweek! Having the chance to attend these events changed my whole view on Motorsports as a whole.

5.       What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

My favorite racing event, that is definitely a hard one. I can narrow it down to two events. First, being the USAC Eastern Storm. I am now the “Official T-Shirt Girl” for Tyler Courtney and Chris Windom. The entire week is a big party and traveling to the different tracks means a variety of food. Grandview has bangin’ perogies. Bridgeport has delicious pulled pork. And don’t get me started about Port Royal’s food, everything there is INCREDIBLE. The second event is the Champion Oil National Open at Williams Grove Speedway. Getting to work behind the scenes and actually build relationships with the drivers is my favorite part. Along with the awesome racing. And the atmosphere is electric, the amount of talent in one place is outstanding. Most recent Natty O Memory: The Greg Hodnett tribute on Sept. 28th, 2018. Not many have the chance to stand on the bridge at Williams Grove Speedway during the 4 Wide Salute, but I had that opportunity. That is a memory that I will cherish forever

6.       If you could give advice to any girl that wants to be like you or be involved in racing, what would you say to them? 

I would tell them to go for it. Take a chance. Just jump in head first! Sign up for the pageant. Apply at a racetrack. Get a pit band to interact with teams. Live in the moment. Life is too short to sit around and wait for opportunities to come to you - Go find the opportunities, yourself. Lastly, don’t care what others think of you, be YOU. In the end, you’re going to be much happier that you did it.


Brooke Rowden

 Photo submitted. Find Brooke on Social Media:  Facebook. Instagram. Twitter.

Photo submitted. Find Brooke on Social Media: Facebook. Instagram. Twitter.

Age: 27

Hometown: Lee’s Summit, Missouri

1.       How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry?

My fiancé, Casey Shuman and I, own and operate the WAR Sprint Car League which is a non-wing sprint car series based out of the Midwest. I am the Media & Digital Content Manager at Bell Racing USA which is a company that manufactures auto racing helmets. I am the Events Manager for the Graham Rahal Foundation. I also started my own non-profit organization a couple years ago called Racers Make A Change (RMAC). We’ve donated $20,000+ to Riley Children’s Hospital over the years with our events.

2.       How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

My family has been in racing since before I was born. My most well-known family member in racing, would be my late cousin Jesse Hockett, who passed away in 2010.

3.       How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

Casey and I have rebuilt the WAR series from the failing state it was in when we purchased it to where it is now. The WAR series has enabled many Midwest, hobby racers to become more widely known and respected within our Motorsports community. I believe my work with RMAC was positive. We gathered two teams of USAC drivers each summer during sprint week to raise money to donate to Riley Children’s Hospital. It’s a lot of fun working for Bell Racing USA. We have strong partnerships with our athletes that helps us empower them to find success within their own personal careers while promoting the Bell brand at the same time.

4.       What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

Chili Bowl - I’ve been going since I could walk. The memories I have from that event are literally priceless and I create new ones each year.

Knoxville Nationals - Same as Chili Bowl. I grew up going to Nationals every summer. It’s so much fun. The racing is dramatic and exciting.

Indy 500 - It’s the greatest spectacle in racing. I wouldn’t miss it. The atmosphere is insane and so cool to be part of.

Jesse Hockett/Daniel McMillin Memorial - It’s a special event for me because it’s in memory of my two cousins who both died tragically at young ages. I love remembering them and honoring them with that event. Wing and non-wing sprint cars. They would be so proud to have their names on it. The atmosphere is one-of-a-kind. Such a fun weekend.

5.       How do you handle being a “female in a man’s world”? Is it easy? Have you ever been received differently, and how have you overcome the adversity of a “woman in Motorsports”?

It’s not easy. It takes patience. I constantly have to let comments roll off my shoulders that I don’t agree with or appreciate. It requires thick skin. Double standards are very apparent, but you just have to be smart in how you approach situations. Don’t put yourself in a situation you aren’t in control of. Be smart about who you give your time to, and always remember you’re being judged for what you say and do. Even though all of the above statements are true, I still strongly believe the Motorsports industry is exactly where I want to be and I love the community. For every one bad apple, there are 50 great ones ready to support me and my ideas. That respect has been earned, and I’m still earning it every day.

6.       If you could give advice to any girl that wants to be like you or be involved in racing, what would you say to them? 

You will work for nothing for a long time before anyone even thinks of offering you pay. Be prepared to work way harder than you will be compensated for, but remember if you do your best each day and deliver on your promises, someday it will pay off. Be smart about who you go into business with. Trust your gut feelings about people. If someone makes you uncomfortable, do not work with them. There are people in the industry who will respect you, seek them out and stick with them. Loyalty is important and don’t burn any bridges.


Brittany Hapney

 Photo submitted. Find Brittany on Social Media:   Facebook   .    Instagram   .    Twitter  .

Photo submitted. Find Brittany on Social Media: Facebook. Instagram. Twitter.

Age: 28

Hometown: Parkersburg, WV

1. How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry?

I’m one of three contributors for Mid-American Racing Updates, I’m the owner and photographer of Foxxie Photography, and I sing the National Anthem at multiple racing events throughout the season.

2. Are you associated with a team, division, track, sponsor, etc.?

I’m involved with Mid-American Racing Updates. We cover Late Model, Sprint Car, and Modified racing in Ohio, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Indiana, and Michigan.

3. How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

My parents started taking me to the dirt track as a young kid. Once I got to high school, I started merging my love of racing with my passion for singing. I spent a couple years as the House National Anthem singer for West Virginia Motor Speedway who hosted the Dirt Track World Championships, Hillbilly 100, Lucas Oil Late Models, All-Star Circuit of Champions, and World of Outlaws. Some of the connections I made there eventually opened up doors at Atomic Speedway, Wayne County Speedway, Tyler County Speedway, and Waynesfield Motorsports Park. After WVMS closed its gates, I started traveling to races more often and became more active on social media where I started interacting with the folks at Mid-American Racing Updates. Fast forward to early 2018- they offered me a position on their staff, I’m still singing the National Anthem at multiple events a year, and I’ve had the most fun and eventful year of racing I can ever remember!

4. How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

I’m not sure I’ve made an “impact”, BUT, I’d like to think that I (along with the other females in this post series) am helping to normalize females in the Motorsports industry. Racing is naturally a fairly male-dominated sport, but you’re seeing more and more women become involved and it’s opening a new door to new opportunities and new female fans of the sport because it’s becoming more appealing and more female-friendly. Aside from that aspect, I just try to do everything I can to shed positive light on the sport and spark interest in potential new fans by interacting with fans and drivers at the track and on social media.

5. What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

The World 100 at Eldora. I went to a few Dreams before I made it to my first World and not even the Dream can come close to the atmosphere and electricity of THE World 100! A close 2nd has to be the World Finals in Charlotte... I’m a Late Model, Sprint Car, AND Modified fan and you can’t go anywhere else to see the best of the best in all of those series’ all on the same night(s)! Aside from the racing, I just enjoy being around dirt track people. Dirt track fans are some of the most awesome people you’ll ever meet. It’s refreshing to be around good people, which makes going to the track feel like a mini vacation!


Mandee Pauch

 Photo submitted. Find Mandee on Social Media & her Website:   Facebook   .    Instagram   .    Twitter  .   Youtube Channel   .    Website.

Photo submitted. Find Mandee on Social Media & her Website: Facebook. Instagram. Twitter. Youtube Channel. Website.

Age: 25

Hometown: Frenchtown, NJ

1. How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry?

I was born into it. I now own my own public relations business where I do work for various drivers, teams and manufacturers in the racing industry as well as do videos for my YouTube channel that covers behind the scenes action.

2. Are you associated with a team, division, track, sponsor, etc.?

I guess you can say mostly Big Block Modifieds. The clients I do work for cover various divisions but I’m mostly at modified or sprint car races. My dad, brother and boyfriend race.

3.       How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

I was born into it. I traveled the country with my family watching my dad race sprint cars and Modifieds. When my brother was old enough to race, I started supporting him as well. I dabbled a little behind the wheel but knew it wasn’t what I wanted to do, so I looked for other outlets to be involved in the sport - Which is how I ended up here.

4. How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

Hmm... I try to make positive impacts all the time. I like to show the different aspects of the sport so people can better understand all that goes into it and appreciate it more. I help teams and businesses prosper. I like to help the sport in a positive way anyway I can.

5. What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

Ice cream is always my go to. I can probably tell you which tracks have the best ice cream and which don’t even have any. My favorite event of all time is definitely the National Open at Williams Grove. It brings back so many memories of growing up at the Grove on Friday nights. It’s one of my favorite tracks too, so it just brings back childhood memories and makes me feel like home. It’s a tough feeling to really explain. But, however, I will say, they have the best blackberry ice cream!


These are pretty amazing Women In Motorsports, and I’m grateful to stand beside these women, who are driven to make a positive impact in the sport we all love and enjoy!

Be sure to check back next Wednesday for another “Women In Motorsports, part 2” of the series, featuring 5 more impressive women!