Women In Motorsports, pt. 4

Season 1. Blog 12.

Welcome back Friend,

This is the fourth and final part in the series of “Women in Motorsports”. I wanted to introduce another set of established ladies that have been key members in the Motorsports industry behind the scenes, as the current 2018 Ms Motorsports, 2 former Ms. Motorsports, who are still highly involved in racing, today, and a Scorer, at a highly traveled to track, Eldora Speedway. The Women In Motorsports part 1, 2, and 3 have been a huge success and I think this one will be no different and a great addition to end this 4 part series! I had asked the same set of questions as before, such as the “How to get involved in racing, as a female, if you don’t have an opportunity to be in the driver’s seat”.  Read through these interviews and I can assure you, there’s more to the industry, than just racing a racecar. If you missed part 1, part 2 or part 3, please catch up and read about 15 other amazing women in this industry and how they too, have helped contribute to this sport or made an impact on the Motorsport Community!

These women have been selected because they are behind the scenes of racing, and not always in the public eye, but have their own goals set to promote the sport we love in a positive way.  This is the exact reason, I felt it would be cool to get to know a few of them, as there are hundreds more in each small town or big town racing community!

Women of Motorsports - Let’s get to meet them in no particular order…In part 3, of the “Women In Motorsports” blog series, we will get to know more about: Taylor Albert, Ms Motorsports 2017, Arynne Moody; Ms. Motorsports 2016, Leslie Donegan; Ms. Motorsports 2018, and Lain Weppler, Eldora’s Scorer.

Taylor Albert

Age: 24

Hometown: Fredericksburg, PA

1. How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry, sponsors etc.?

This year, I fell back into racers daughter and race fan mode, but last year, I was Ms. Motorsports 2017.

2. How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

As most, I was “born” into racing. My dad raced street stock and modified at Penn National Speedway in Pennsylvania before I was born, so I grew up in the shop and around the track. Then my dad, Scotty, as I call him, stopped racing to start a business and help coach me in competitive softball, then he picked racing back up when I went off to college. I’ve spent most weekends at the track since he picked it back up.

3. How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

I can only hope I made an impact and opened the door to the younger generation of female figures involved in racing who want to somehow get involved in the racing community. As Ms. Motorsports, I tried to interact and make some sort of connection with as many people as I could. I made appearances at races and events at over 30 tracks, attending multiple racing series, and various types of racing including dirt and asphalt.

4. What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

Ahh, I could go on and on forever on this topic. Every track has its perks, and of course I must include food, as a highlight at each track. At Utica Rome, I recommend the pizza logs. At Orange County Fair Speedway, the London Broil. At Knoxville Nationals, the pork tenderloin. At Oswego, the pepperoni pizza. Make sure you attend Action Track USA (in Kutztown, PA) and Port Royal Speedway extra hungry during fair weeks! Almost every track has their own “big event” during the season, so it’s nice to try to make it to those shows and also Memorial races - Those are special, as well. The atmosphere is something that a lot of race fans thrive on; the energy, car counts, advertising, big names in attendance, fan involvement.... it helps draw the crowds and there’s no doubt that there will be some good, competitive racing at those shows.

5. How do you handle being a “female in a man’s world”? Is it easy? Have you ever been received differently, and how have you overcome the adversity of a “woman in Motorsports”?

I think being a female in the “man’s world” is very empowering. The fact that we, as women, have a place and are being more and more recognized in Motorsports is great. Some females are awesome enough to get behind the wheel, but we all contribute in different ways and behind the scenes in ways that go unseen or unrecognized. To be a positive figure to our younger racing generation and to support the sport that I’m passionate about makes the adversity easy to overcome. It puts a smile on my face to see the sport growing with empowering females.

6. If you could give advice to any girl that wants to be like you and be involved in racing - What would you say to them?

DO IT. Go out there and get involved. Travel to different tracks, broaden your horizons and watch various types of racing. You will never stop learning, no matter how many races you go to. First impressions mean a lot. Spread your love for the sport and do it for the right reasons. Most importantly, respect yourself and set your goals high and always put a smile on.


Arynne Moody

   Bob Yurko Photography    photo . Follow Arynne on her   Facebook page.

Bob Yurko Photography photo. Follow Arynne on her Facebook page.

Age: 32

Hometown: East Berlin, PA

1. How are you invovled with the Motorsports industry?

I write for Area Auto Racing News. I cover Lincoln Speedway's results on a weekly basis. I also write other stories that typically show the more human aspect of racing; the personal aspects of those involved in racing. I also help work the Fan Zone at the Indoor Races in Trenton, Atlantic City, and Allentown. But I am first and foremost a fan!

2. Are you associated with a team, division, track, sponsor, etc.?

I am associated with Area Auto Racing News. My favorite divisions are the 410 and 358 sprint cars. I also sing our National Anthem at various tracks around the area

3. How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

I have been involved in dirt track racing since I was very young. My dad used to help Bill Case, Jr. on his 358 and 410 sprint cars. I loved being around the cars from day one. My dad and Bill even entered me in the Little Miss Motorsports pageant when I was 5. I met Ms. Motorsports 1991 that year; Midi Miller. I remember loving everything about the race track. I was dubbed a mudscraper early on. My dad eventually began racing his own 358 sprint car. I used to follow him around the garage and the race track, trying to learn everything I could. I was renamed Gear Girl as I got a little older. I loved changing the gears on the car. My dad used to say that if he couldn't find me, I was probably laying under the rear of someone else's car changing gears. Dad was a part of the KARS series. We traveled all over to race, and I loved being a small part of that group. When I was little, those drivers and crew members were like a family away from home for me.

4. How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

I would like to think that one of my greatest accomplishments in racing was winning the title of Ms. Motorsports 2016. I was able to represent the greatest sport there is for a year. I tried to include children in everything I did at the tracks I visited. I had coloring contests and tried to put the next generation of racers and racing fans, first. Since handing over that title, I have continued to keep myself involved in all that is racing. I have been writing weekly for Area Auto Racing News, covering Lincoln Speedway's results. I also help in the Fan Zone at the Indoor Races run by AARN, trying to continue to spread my love of racing.

5. What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

In my mind, the best thing about racing is the atmosphere. No matter what else was going on in my life, racing always made me happy. It was one of the constants in my life and is still that for me. I have so many amazing friends because of racing, many who are more like family. The thrill, the pure enjoyment I get from being at the track; it just cannot be replaced by anything else. I honestly don't know what I'd do on the weekends if I weren't involved in racing. I even go to the Indoor Races in the winter and work at the Motorsports Expo. There is no off-season.

My favorite event of the year has to be the Williams Grove National Open. The rivalry between our PA Posse and the World of Outlaws makes this one of the most exciting races of the year. The fans, all the extra events, and the entire atmosphere of that weekend is incredible.


Leslie Donegan

 Jay Dugan Photo. Follow Leslie on Social Media. Ms. Motorsports 2018 Facebook page. Twitter. and Ms. Motorsports 2018 Instagram. Leslie’s Instagram.

Jay Dugan Photo. Follow Leslie on Social Media. Ms. Motorsports 2018 Facebook page. Twitter. and Ms. Motorsports 2018 Instagram. Leslie’s Instagram.

Age: 25

Hometown: Macungie, PA

1.      How are you involved with the Motorsports Industry, sponsors etc.? 

I am currently holding the title of Ms. Motorsports 2018.  I represent Area Auto Racing News.

2.      How did you get involved in the Motorsports Industry?

I became involved in dirt track racing because my ex-boyfriend had wanted me to support him at the races.  Once we broke up, I had fallen in love with the sport and wanted to find my own place in racing.  My best friend, Gabby and her family (the Manmiller’s), are the main reason I stayed with racing.  We spent most Saturday nights, for the last 3 years, at Grandview Speedway cheering for her dad. 

3.      How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

I have put a lot of time and effort being Ms. Motorsports.  I always try to put my best foot forward and be a positive person.  I have had so many awesome interactions with fans and kids at the racetrack. One little girl told me that she wanted to go to college when she grew up and be just like me.  I had a woman who told me recently that I am a role model for her daughter.  These experiences make any drama surrounding my ‘reign’ worth it.

4.      What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

I love going to the Freedom 76er at Grandview.  I love camping with my racing family, eating pierogies, and spending time with good friends. This year I had the opportunity to attend the Knoxville Nationals.  That is an event which no other can compare.  The whole town is a part of this race.  The atmosphere is truly unique to such a large event but still feeling that grass roots dirt track energy.  I think this race is where I started to love sprint car racing.  Also, the bbq pork nachos and Hawaiian chicken are probably the best track foods I have ever eaten. Dirt track racing is so much more than just going and watching a race.  It’s the whole atmosphere and the great people you meet along the way which make it unlike any other sports I’ve been a part of.  Even in Knoxville, IA we ran into friends from home.

5.      How do you handle being a “female in a man’s world”? Is it easy? Have you ever been received differently, and how have you overcome the adversity of a “woman in motorsports”?

I have met so many strong, incredible women in racing. For myself, I think girls are usually a “female in a man’s world.”  Being a trophy queen, I capitalized off of being female and try to use that to my advantage. Most controversy I have had to deal with, is actually from girls not supporting other females.  The gossip that I’ve heard about myself is astounding.  That is what was most surprising to me. I feel it is important for girls to learn to grow from adversity.  I believe that you can use perceived weaknesses as a strength in most situations.  If people underestimate you for being a female (or any reason), let them.  It will be more powerful when they see what you’re capable of, when people aren’t expecting it.

6.      If you could give advice to any girl that wants to be like you and be involved in racing - What would you say to them?

Go for it.  It doesn’t matter what other people say or think about you.  If you love racing and want to be involved in it, all the positives that come from it, far outweigh any negatives. You can enter the Ms. Motorsports pageant this year at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center! 



Lain Weppler

 Fing Lain on Social Media.   Facebook.     Twitter  . and   Instagram

Fing Lain on Social Media. Facebook. Twitter. and Instagram

Age: 21

Hometown: Marietta, OH

1. How are you invovled with the Motorsports industry?

I currently work as the main scorer for Eldora Speedway running the westhold transponder system. Before that, I was the full time scorer for Legendary Hilltop Speedway in Marietta Ohio for six years. I have also traveled to various tracks across Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky teaching others how to score and run the west hold system. In many cases I have stepped in as race director along with other rolls in the scoring tower. I have also been known to sing the national anthem.

2. How did you get invovled with the Motorsports industry?

In 2011, my dad re-opened in old local track that had sat dormant for over 30 years. My whole family pitched in to bring Legendary Hilltop Speedway back from the dead. It’s kind of crazy how life works, right after my dad started reviving the track, my oldest brother Levi passed away. The track gave my family a place to grieve together while also giving others the chance to fall in love with racing like we did. I helped everywhere at our track but soon took on the role as our full-time scorer. I taught myself how to run the westhold system. I soon found myself traveling all over to help other tracks score. I was then recommended by a friend in the racing world to Roger Slack of Eldora and was soon after hired as their main scorer. My two older brothers Lance and Lucas also race a sport mod so I enjoy going to watch them when I can.

3. How have you made an impact on the Motorsports Industry?

I feel I have made a large impact on the motor sports industry. Every track that I have either helped score at or have been the main scorer, I am usually one of the only women and always the youngest in the scoring tower. That in itself I feel is a large accomplishment. I feel I have opened a door to the way people view women filling decision making roles in the Motorsports industry. The fact that the managers of Eldora have the confidence in me to score legendary races like The Dream or The World 100 without question, is very rewarding. I also feel that I help bring interest from my generation to the sport of dirt track racing. I will soon be graduating with my BS in Chemical Engineering and hope to stay involved with the motor sports industry as a female Chemical Engineer. I will admit that I did tear up when the memorial videos were played at The Dream and The World 100. Knowing that I was now apart of such a legendary race was something that I could’ve never dreamed of.

4. What is your favorite racing related event to go to and what keeps you coming back?

I don’t have a single favorite racing event that I go to every year. My favorite races are when my whole family pack up and go watch my brothers race. Being a scorer, I rarely get to actually sit and watch a race, let alone pick favorites,so when I get to relax and cheer on my brothers it reminds me of why I fell in love with the sport in the first place. Plus they let me help set up the car, which I really enjoy. I don’t mind getting my hands dirty.

5. How do you handle being a “female in a man’s world”? Is it easy? Have you ever been received differently, and how have you overcome the adversity of a “woman in motorsports”?

Being a “female in a man’s world” does not phase me at all. I grew up with three older brothers and was raised always being told that I could do anything that they could. There was never any gap. I am also a Chemical Engineering student at Ohio University, which can also be described as a male-dominated industry. And in all honesty, I’ve been more successful than a good majority of my fellow male students. As far as being a woman in motorsports, I have not been questioned too often. Although there have been a couple times in which my decisions were questioned, I am confident in my skills and I’m always respectful.I allow my actions to speak for themselves and always try to have fun. I have also been very lucky to work with colleagues who have the same confidence in me that I have in myself.

5. If you could give advice to any girl that wants to be like you and be involved in racing - What would you say to them?

I would tell that girl to go for it! Don’t let anyone else try to dictate what you can or cannot do or what you should or shouldn’t like. Racing has been a huge blessing in my life and I’ve met many lifelong friends while being involved. Talk to anyone you can about racing (lifelong fan’s, new fans, drivers, track workers, etc). They all have a different story as to why they love racing. Also, don’t feel that you need to be in a racing family your whole life to love the sport. I have only been involved with the sport for eight years and see how far I have come. Have confidence in yourself. Always remember to stay humble, work hard and be kind.


I hope you found this “Women In Motorsports” series interesting. and if you would like it to see this series continue, please drop a comment in the comments section!


Mark Your Calendar: Motorsports Trade Show in Oaks, PA on January 18-20th, 2019.

2019 Ms. Motorsports PAGEANT

As many of you know, I, Nicole Signor, the author of these blogs on Killer Mile Motorsports, did previously compete for the 2018 Ms Motorsports title. No, I did not win, but let me share my thoughts with you and why I think you should give this pageant (or any pageant) a chance.

I highly encourage any female who likes racing, even if you aren’t from the Tri-State Area (PA, DE, NJ), to give this pageant a shot! It’s okay to be nervous. Trust me, that’s most females experience their first time trying something that may be out of their comfort zone! However, it is a very fun and fast-paced day. You get to meet a lot of other females, who you will form friendships with, and stay friends with over the years to come!

I don’t think of these competitions as whether a win or lose scenario. What I mean by that is, I don’t think that just because you didn’t win the crown and title, doesn’t mean you “lost it all”. I think it’s about what you learn and what you can take from these pageants to achieve your own goals and help continue to round you as a woman involved in the Motorsports Industry. It’s a good start, if you would like to be more involved, and learn more about the industry. After all, you may just win, and your year will be filled with what your passionate about!

You can sign up now. I have included the link for the sign up form below, once it goes live to the public! Also, if you have any questions, feel free to reach out to Taylor, Arynne or Leslie (or any past Ms. Motorsports as well) a message to hear about their experiences as Ms. Motorsports. I’m sure any of these women would be glad to explain the duties and the Motorsports family that you will get to be apart of, if crowned.

Good Luck, ladies!


Special Thanks

I would like to say a huge thank you to all of the ladies that were on board with doing these interviews. It takes a lot when your behind the scenes to have an article written on you, to be thrown into the public eye.